Canada Post and Hamilton square off in landmark mail delivery case

It’ll be a historic day in Hamilton courts on Tuesday as Canada Post faces off against the city over where it can put super mailboxes.

Canada Post is installing community mailboxes across Hamilton Mountain as part of a nationwide plan to phase out urban door-to-door mail delivery.

But the city wants a say in how they do it and has gone to court to assert those rights. Canada Post rejects this notion, saying federal legislation gives it a mandate to deliver the mail, and that trumps municipal powers.

The fight is being watched by many other municipalities across the country, all of which are facing similar plans from the postal service to install super mailboxes.

Canada Post is already facing a lawsuit from a union representing postal workers that wants the Federal Court to declare the cancellation of home delivery unconstitutional. And a group of Montreal-area mayors last week said they were considering joining the action, accusing Canada Post of ignoring their concerns.

In the face of declining traditional mail volumes, Canada Post announced a plan in December 2013 to end door-to-door delivery and gave itself five years to implement the move to community mailboxes.

Read more: Canada Post and Hamilton square off in landmark mail delivery case – Latest Hamilton news – CBC Hamilton

Connecting rural India: Network-connected handheld devices for postal delivery soon

NEW DELHI: The Department of Posts is likely to soon start a Rs 1,370-crore mega project that will allow India’s 1.3 lakh postmen in rural regions to use network-connected handheld terminals for postal delivery.

The project, awarded last year to a consortium that includes state-run Telecom Consultants of India (TCIL), system integrator Ricoh India and Hyderabad-based VisionTek, which provides handheld devices, was delayed due to unavailability of components.

Big IT companies such as HP and Wipro were also in the running for the contract rolled out by the ministry of communications & information technology.

“Based on terminal devices on network, the DoP initiative is likely to happen later this month. The project was delayed as the private company took time to deliver the components,” TCIL’s chairman and managing director Vimal Wakhlu told ET.

Read more: Connecting rural India- Network-connected handheld devices for postal delivery soon – The Times of India

CWU calls for Royal Mail to prioritise growth after decent results

Responding to Royal Mail’s annual results, released today (Thursday), the CWU described them as a decent set of results for this year, whilst calling on the company to work harder at delivering growth.

Dave Ward, CWU general secretary-elect, said:

“The results produced by Royal Mail today are decent, and show Royal Mail can go forward in good shape.

“These results have been delivered by improving productivity and the hard of work of postal workers. Those workers have shown they have supported the need to change to build growth in the business.

“I am today calling on Royal Mail to show they have the same drive and commitment for growth and innovation and call on them to work with CWU to deliver it.”

Commenting on the decline in the letters market, Dave added:

“However, we also recognise the note of caution that that there remains a structural decline in the letters market of 4 per cent. Therefore, the union again calls on the regulator Ofcom, to recognise this clear fact and to stop blindly increasing the competition in the sector.

“The recent announcement by Whistl that they have discontinued their delivery operation is a clear sign of the overcrowded postal market; and jobs will continue to be lost if the regulator fails to change its approach.

“Ofcom’s approach to competition is a continuous threat to jobs, as well as to terms and conditions as they push for a race to the bottom.

“Ofcom has also failed to understand the impact of unfair competition on the universal service obligation (USO) and we would remind them again, safeguarding the USO is their primary obligation.”

Royal Mail warns of cut-throat competition despite Whistl’s fall

Royal-Mail-Moya-Greene-graphicThe ferocious price war in the overcrowded parcel-delivery sector promises cheap prices and speedy deliveries this Christmas, Royal Mail has said.

Royal Mail chief executive Moya Greene said her competitors, including DPD, Yodel and Hermes, had all added capacity, despite the collapse of City Link last Christmas and Whistl’s decision earlier this month to pull out of doorstep deliveries in three UK cities.

Royal Mail, which pitched its privatisation in October 2013 on the expected growth in the parcels market, said that Amazon’s decision to launch its own courier network was taking away much of the market growth that the former state-owned postal operator had anticipated.

Read more: Royal Mail warns of cut-throat competition despite Whistl’s fall – Business News – Business – London Evening Standard

Canada Post refuses to disclose info about delivery complaints

From the Toronto Star:

Canada Post is refusing to disclose any information related to complaints about mail delivery last year or the end of door-to-door home delivery.

The Star filed two separate requests under the federal Access to Information Act and despite months of wrangling over the wording of the requests Canada Post flatly rejected the requests and is keeping all records secret.

The Star asked for aggregate data and a summary of the types of complaints related to both mail delivery in 2014 and the switch to community mailboxes.

In response to the Star’s requests, the Crown corporation, which only became subject to Access to the Information Act in 2007, said it is keeping the information secret because disclosure of the information “could reasonably be expected to prejudice the competitive position of a government institution or to interfere with contractual or other negotiations of a government institution.”

As well, it said the information being sought “contains trade secrets, or of financial, commercial, scientific or technical information” that belongs to and has consistently been treated as confidential by Canada Post.

This position is in contrast to that taken by other public institutions, including the Toronto Transit Commission and the Toronto Public Library, which regularly disclose complaints when asked.

Michel Drapeau, a law professor at the University of Ottawa who specializes in access to information laws, noted Canada Post has a monopoly on mail delivery in Canada, so it can hardly argue its economic interests could be prejudiced if complaint information is revealed.

“Canada Post is, to my mind, beyond the pale,” Drapeau said. “They really don’t care. It’s as if they consider themselves above and beyond.”

Source: Canada Post refuses to disclose info about delivery complaints | Toronto Star