Bipartisan group in Congress calls for end to USPS service slowdown

West Virginia Congressman David B. McKinley, R-W.Va., introduced a bipartisan resolution calling for an end to the postal slowdown and a return to prior service standards.

On July 1, 2012 the United States Postal Service (USPS) initiated an aggressive plan to cut costs by closing rural post offices, mail processing facilities and reducing First Class Mail delivery. This has had a disproportionate impact businesses and families in rural areas.

“We’ve heard from hundreds of West Virginians — newspapers, businesses and individual postal customers negatively impacted by these delivery changes. By restoring prompt and reliable service, we can rebuild trust in the postal service and give rural Americans peace of mind” said McKinley.

The fall 2013 closure of the USPS Mail Processing Facility in Bridgeport has required mail to be shipped to Pittsburgh or Charleston for processing, resulting in delays, increased costs, and unreliable service. Beckley mail is sent to Charleston for processing. This month, USPS announced it would end overnight delivery of First Class Mail in further efforts to cut costs.

“The recent changes implemented by the United States Postal Service are having a dramatic and negative impact on all businesses and residents living in rural parts of the United States,” said Don Smith, executive director of the West Virginia Press Association. “This recent USPS decision is a national issue that is impacting the entire country. The newspaper industry across America is just one segment of the national economy that will suffer as a result of these changes. We hope other members of Congress will support his resolution and join in the discussion.”

“This postal slowdown is causing real harm across West Virginia as credit card bills are delayed, consumers cancel unreliable newspapers, and timely medicine deliveries are threatened. The Post Office should reconsider these changes and work with Congress to develop an alternative model,” McKinley added.

The bipartisan resolution, H. Res. 54, was co-sponsored by Reps. Paul Tonko, D-N.Y.; Don Young, R-Alaska.; Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio; Doug LaMalfa, R-Calif; Richard Nolan, N.M.; David Joyce, R-Ohio; and Linda Sanchez, D-Calif.

USPS Network Rationalization Phase 2 FAQS

On Monday the USPS updated its list of Frequently Asked Questions about its plans to consolidate plants and lower service standards nationwide. Here is the text of the FAQ. Click here to download the FAQ as a .pdf file.

Phase 2 Network Rationalization

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How much mail will be delivered overnight once Phase 2 is implemented?

Current estimates indicate approximately 20% of the First-Class Mail volume is expected to be delivered overnight, more than 35% is expected to be delivered in 2 days and about 44% delivered in 3 days. Continue reading

Video: Fayetteville postal workers protest downtown facility closure


Marching through a downpour, about 30 postal workers made their way from the Airborne Special Operations Museum to the Green Street Post Office Monday morning.

They didn’t mind the rain because 400 good paying, local jobs are at stake, they said.

"U.S. Mail is not for sale," the protesters chanted, their shoes splashing through puddles along Hay Street.

The group is protesting the pending closure of the Green Street facility, a major hub for mail in southeastern North Carolina that processed 709 million pieces of mail last fiscal year. The closing, slated for this spring, is a part of the latest phase of the Postal Reorganization Act, which consolidates facilities in a federal cost-cutting effort that began in 2006. Four hundred jobs would be lost from Fayetteville’s main post office, and union leaders said Monday to expect a major change in the way you get your mail.

via Fayetteville postal workers protest downtown facility closure |

APWU: Dimondstein Statement on Lower USPS Service Standards This Week

apwulogo01/05/2015 – Where is it? Why hasn’t it arrived? Beginning this week, these questions will be asked by millions of Americans who will wonder why their prescription drugs, their church bulletin, their paycheck, and other important correspondence haven’t been delivered. The lowering of service standards by the United States Postal Service, effective today, will cause unnecessary hardships for the public and small businesses. It also will severely damage the world’s most efficient and affordable delivery network by driving away mail volume and revenue.

Postal customers may unfairly blame their letter carrier or their local post office, but the culpability rests with Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe. The elimination of overnight delivery of first-class mail and the delay of mail throughout the country is part of the same flawed strategy that’s behind efforts to end Saturday and door-to-door deliveries, close post offices, cut back hours, and make other reductions in mail service.

The travesty is that the cuts are absolutely unnecessary – because postal operations are profitable. The Postal Service recently announced its most profitable quarter in seven years. In fiscal years 2014 and 2013, the USPS enjoyed an operating profit of $1.4 billion and more than $600 million, respectively.

As of last month, 51 senators and 160 House members had called for a one-year moratorium on the reduction in service and the closure of the mail processing centers to allow Congress time to enact postal legislation that would improve, not degrade, postal service. The Postmaster General and USPS Board of Governors should honor their request. They should stop delaying America’s mail.

For more information, visit

Video: NC consolidation to cost jobs, slow mail delivery

beakinaboxProcessing mail, packages, and parcels out of one local processing plant will soon move further west. The change will leave some without jobs, others with possible delivery delays.

Postal workers at the Rocky Mount Processing and Distribution Center are part of the USPS consolidation plan.

Last week, the USPS notified workers that by January 2015 the plant will shut down. All mail will then head 67 miles west to Raleigh’s processing plant. That means if someone mails a letter in Greenville to another Greenville resident, it will head to Raleigh first.

Read more: USPS To Close Local Processing Plant, Will Save $6 Million.