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Georgia: USPS nurse admits she forged her license

US-Department-Of-Justi_fmtATLANTA – Fertina Brown, a former mail carrier, pleaded guilty to one count of making a false document by forging a license to work as a nurse with the United States Postal Service.

“Brown put people’s health and safety at risk – simply to earn a better wage,” said United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates. “By presenting a forged nursing license, she defrauded the Postal Service and will now be held accountable for her greed.”

“Fertina Brown reflects just a small percentage of employees who failed to uphold the trust and integrity placed in them.  The U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General takes these cases very serious and investigates them to the fullest extent of the law,” said Paul Bowman, Area Special Agent in Charge of the United States Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges and other information presented in court:  In 2007, Brown was working for the United States Postal Service (USPS) as a mail carrier, when she applied for and ultimately obtained a nursing position in the Postal Service’s North Metro Distribution Center.  In January 2011, the USPS requested a copy of Brown’s most recent nursing license because the previously-provided copy had an expiration date of January 31, 2011. On February 2, 2011, Brown presented the USPS with a State of Georgia nursing license that turned out to be forged.  Based on an investigation, the USPS determined that Brown’s nursing register number belonged to an individual residing in Texas who was on active duty with the U.S. military.  As a result of the investigation, Brown resigned from the Postal Service in June 2011.  In total, Brown earned over $100,000 in additional income (versus what she would have made as a mail carrier).

On May 7, 2013, Brown, 44, of Henry County, Ga., was charged in a Criminal Information with one count of making a false document.  Today she pleaded guilty to the information and could receive a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.  In determining the actual sentence, the Court will consider the United States Sentencing Guidelines, which are not binding but provide appropriate sentencing ranges for most offenders.

Sentencing is scheduled for September 13, 2013, at 9:30 a.m. before United States District Judge William S. Duffey, Jr.

This case is being investigated by Agents of the United States Postal Service, Office of Inspector General.

Assistant United States Attorney Jeffrey W. Davis is prosecuting the case.

 

  • Chuck Les

    What about all those posers pretending to be postmasters?

  • TheRealFed

    The Harlem Globetrotters are in town…let’s welcome them by whistling “Sweet Georgia Brown”.

  • Jack Frost

    They haven’t done hands on medical care of employees in several years. The nurses CBA is up next month and look for many to retire rather than be relocated under the next CBA staffing matrix. They were grandfathered in but that stops next month.