Florida Letter Carrier Convicted of Workers’ Comp Fraud - postalnews blog

Florida Letter Carrier Convicted of Workers’ Comp Fraud

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA – Former postal employee, Jacquelyn V. Myers, 55, of Tallahassee, Florida, was found guilty by a federal jury yesterday of healthcare fraud and making false statements to obtain workers’ compensation benefits.

Evidence presented at the two-day jury trial established that, while claiming she was physically unable to fulfill her responsibilities as a rural letter carrier with the Postal Service, Myers competed in more than 80 athletic events in Florida and Georgia. Although she claimed that she could only handle “light duty” in her government job, Myers was competing in 5K races, 10K races, triathlons, and marathons, including the Boston Marathon, which she ran in April 2010.

In May 2009, Myers reported that she had suffered a lower back injury during the annual letter carriers’ food drive. As a result, she was relieved of the letter carrying duties for which she had been hired, and placed on “light duty.” Between June and December of 2009, Myers told her treating physicians and physical therapists that her back injury had not improved, and that she was unable to twist and bend at the waist – activities associated with the delivery of mail. Photographs and videotapes taken during the same period show Myers running barefoot on gravel in a cross-country event, and swimming, cycling, and running in a triathlon. Evidence at trial demonstrated that Myers’ race times actually improved over those recorded prior to her reported date of injury.

The defendant faces maximum sentences of five years in prison for false statements and ten years in prison for healthcare fraud. Sentencing has been scheduled for July 25, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., before United States District Judge Robert L. Hinkle.

Pamela C. Marsh, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Florida, praised the work of the United States Postal Service, Office of Inspector General, whose investigation led to the convictions.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jason Coody.