Tales of the OIG: Recent Investigations of USPS executives

Marijuana gummies and sex in the office are among the highlights of the most recent OIG report to Congress. The Office of Inspector General is required to submit a report on its activities to Congress twice a year. Included in the report is a listing of investigations of USPS PCES Executives.

Here’s the list for the period from October 1 1018 through March 31, 2019:

Substantiated allegations:

  1. We investigated an allegation that a Postal Service district manager allowed his fiancée, who is also a postal employee, to work at home in lieu of securing child care for their children.While the investigation was not referred for prosecution, the OIG provided its Report of Investigation (ROI) to the Postal Service’s vice president for appropriate action.

    The manager entered into a settlement agreement with the Postal Service and relinquished his position as district manager.

  2. We investigated an allegation that, while on travel for a business meeting, a Postal Service manager purchased marijuana “gummies” and insisted that subordinate employees eat them. The manager also directed the employees, who were in a government vehicle, to take gummies back to the manager’s duty station.The investigation was referred for prosecution, but not accepted. The OIG provided its ROI to the Postal Service for appropriate action. The manager was removed from the Postal Service.
  3. We investigated an allegation that a district manager approved the production and use of unauthorized parking placards for Postal Service employees to park in prohibited or metered spaces to avoid parking tickets. The placards were produced by a Postal Service print shop.

    The investigation was not referred for prosecution. The OIG provided its ROI to the Postal Service for appropriate action. The district manager was given a formal discussion. In addition, the print shop was closed.

Unsubstantiated allegations

  1. We investigated an anonymous allegation that an executive caused workplace environment issues, failed to pay employees correctly, and committed travel fraud.The OIG conducted investigative steps that included but were not limited to email and travel record reviews and database searches for any additional complaints. The steps did not disclose any information to substantiate the allegations.
  2. We investigated an allegation that a Postal Service executive was reportedly observed having sexual relations with another postal employee in a postal facility administrative office. The investigation revealed that the executive was engaged in a personal relationship with the employee, but the allegation was not substantiated. During the investigation, it was discovered that the executive used his government-issued phone to view and store sexually explicit images.The investigation was not referred for prosecution. The OIG provided its ROI to the Postal Service for appropriate action. For the misuse of the assigned phone, the executive was downgraded.
  3. We investigated an allegation that a postal executive’s relationship with a director of a foreign postal operator caused the appearance of a lack of impartiality related to the executive’s involvement in a Postal Service debt-settlement agreement with the foreign post. The investigation confirmed that the executive had a personal relationship with the director of the foreign postal operator, but did not substantiate a lack of impartiality.The investigation was not referred for prosecution. The OIG provided its ROI to the Postal Service for appropriate action. Postal Service management instituted a new process requiring multiple levels of review and approval for external correspondence concerning financial matters.

Source: USPSOIG Semiannual Report to Congress October 1, 2018 — March 31, 2019