New stamps will feature Post Office murals

 

The Postal Service will celebrate its Post Office lobby government-commissioned artworks from the 1930’s and 1940’s by featuring five lobby paintings on stamps. During this era, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration commissioned artwork in Post Offices across the nation to provide jobs to artists and illustrate the history and culture of local communities across America.

The first-day-of-issue event is free and open to the public. News of the stamp is being shared with the hashtags #PostOfficeMurals and #MuralStamps 

Who:

Patrick Mendonca, senior director, Office of the Postmaster General
Travis Williams, Piggott, AR, mayor
John Gill, chairman, Arkansas Parks and Recreation Foundation
Stephanie N. Jett, postmaster, Piggott

When:

Wednesday, April 10, 2019, at 11 a.m. CDT

Where:

Piggott Main Post Office
116 N. 3rd Avenue
Piggott, AR 72454-2000

RSVP:

Dedication ceremony attendees are encouraged to RSVP at usps.com/postofficemurals.

Background:

In the 1930s and 1940s, murals brought a touch of beauty to Post Offices across the United States. These works of art were designed to help boost the morale of Americans during the Great Depression.

This pane of 10 stamps features five different murals. On the stamp art, the town or city and state in which the work of art is located is printed underneath each mural. The murals included are: “Kiowas Moving Camp” (1936), Anadarko, OK; “Mountains and Yucca” (1937), Deming, NM; “Antelope” (1939), Florence, CO; “Sugarloaf Mountain” (1940), Rockville, MD; and “Air Mail” (1941), Piggott, AR.

The Postal Service is committed to the upkeep of these classic paintings and has a federal preservation officer and historian to both help maintain the beauty of the murals and also educate the public about their place in postal lore. Today, many of these works have been restored and remain on display for the public to enjoy.

Art Director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamps.

The Post Office Murals stamps are being issued as Forever stamps and will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price.