USPS told employee he shouldn’t have been involved with GoFundMe page for critically injured co-worker

The US Postal Service told an employee that he should not have been involved in setting up a GoFundMe page for a co-worker who was critically injured on the job. The agency also said that the injured employee was prohibited from “accepting cash gifts that exceed $20”. A spokesperson further stated that “This is a federal law that applies to all government employees; it is not a Postal Service policy”.

The USPS statement was in response to a claim made by the The “NALC Truth” Facebook page:

About a week ago the Good Samaritan was called into a meeting with some people who identified themselves as USPS ethics lawyers. They told the Good Samaritan that he had violated ethics rules by starting up a collection for Mailman Mike. They told the Good Samaritan that he would have to refund all the money collected or he would be subject to disciplinary action. The branch president, the Good Samaritan reports, called Fred Rolando and described what was going on. Rolando, it is reported, said the money should be refunded or OIG would become involved and the Good Samaritan might be disciplined.

The fund raising page, which was mentioned in news reports about the incident, has in fact disappeared.

A new GoFundMe appeal, which makes no mention of the letter carrier’s occupation or employer, has been started by the carrier’s brother, who is not a postal employeee.

Here’s the full statement we received from the USPS:

The Postal Service has advised the employee that he should not have been involved in it; the injured employee is prohibited by law from accepting cash gifts that exceed $20. This is a federal law that applies to all government employees; it is not a Postal Service policy.

  • Wilwelfart

    This was all initiated by human resource manager in Westchester dishing Bob Lucas

  • retired too

    I’ll sleep better tonight knowing the Postal Go Fund Me Police are on the job protecting the unsuspecting public from scams like this.

  • Guest

    Nice thought but that is what workmans comp is for. Bob Lucas did the right thing.

  • postalnews

    You might sleep even easier if you go to the new page and make a donation!

    https://www.gofundme.com/martinez-family-benfit-fund

  • Dec

    He did the right thing! The right think would be to give safety talks and letting us know this happened before! The right thing would be to then investigate and not have you work out of the back of a truck instead of making us watch the same damn video 2x a year of a guy who died! They should be ashamed of themselves! You ever go on workers comp. it’s nothing to live off of! Whoever you are Guest must have a cushion job high up who never did the job!

  • retired too

    Absolutely correct, I’m ashamed I failed to advise and do such a course of action. Thank you for pointing that out.

  • Sam73065

    Sorry but I disagree with your sarcasm. USPS is subject to federal law and must protect its interests. Also as we all see, it was simple enough to start another fundraising effort, that is legal and does not violate federal law. I get the frustration with the law making it more difficult to help out a fellow employee, but as federal employees we’re stuck with the law. Like it or not the USPS did this family a favor by making sure they don’t violate the law and cause the family even more grief later if there were any legal & financial consequences.

  • retired too

    that’s fine you have a point , it just seems it could have handled with more understanding. Of course it is possible the article failed to mention certain points, such as did they advise him all he had to do was as you said, tweak the effort

  • proudcarrier

    The PO is rarely accused of having a heart. Or common sense : That’s why we used to get heat stroke talks every August . . . . In South Florida, because someone far up north had a hot day they weren’t used to, like 85 F in Maine or whatever, and passed out. Carriers in South Florida worked in the heat daily and knew how to deal with it, rarely having a problem. But then after 100 days straight of 90F plus heat, not , counting the days of 88F and 104 % humidity and rain, there came the talk on heat stroke.