Megan Brennan takes over as 74th Postmaster General of the United States

WASHINGTON — Megan J. Brennan officially became the 74th Postmaster General and CEO of the U.S. Postal Service yesterday, Feb. 1.

Outlining key themes in a letter to employees today, Postmaster General Brennan said she would seek to advance transformative strategies that invest in the future of the Postal Service and shape growth opportunities for the organization and the industries it serves. Among these strategies are better use of data and technology, speeding the pace of product and service innovations, continual process improvements throughout the organization, and fully engaging and leveraging the talents of its 600,000-employee workforce.

“We can reinvigorate the way we serve our customers and the public by constantly looking forward as an organization, anticipating the changing needs of our customers, and adapting as quickly as we can to a competitive and evolving marketplace,” said Brennan.

Brennan expressed gratitude and appreciation for the hard work, dedicated service and commitment of the Postal Service’s 600,000 employees, and the value they provide to the American people every day.

“As we collectively shape a brighter future for the organization, I am always mindful that the Postal Service is not merely defined by what it does, but rather by the many people who have dedicated their careers to serving the American public,” said Brennan. “Your commitment to our public service mission and to delivering for our customers defines who we are as an organization and is the bedrock of all of our successes.”

Appointed by the Governors of the Postal Service and announced in November, Brennan had been the Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President of the Postal Service, and previously held roles as Vice President of both Eastern Area and Northeast Area Operations. Brennan began her 29-year Postal Service career as a mail carrier in Lancaster, PA.

Brennan earned a Master of Business Administration degree as a Sloan fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is also an alumna of Immaculata College in Pennsylvania. She will take the ceremonial oath of office at an installation event at Postal Service Headquarters next month.

Text of the new PMGs letter to postal workers:

Dear Postal Colleagues:

As I begin my tenure as Postmaster General, I am deeply humbled by the opportunity to serve this organization and the American public.

Like many of us, I was attracted to a career with the Postal Service because I was inspired by friends and family members who served their communities as employees of the Postal Service. That inspiration has stayed with me every day since 1986-when I started as a Letter Carrier in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is rekindled whenever I think of the dedication of postal employees everywhere who serve the public and our customers so well, and who have made the Postal Service such an amazing organization.

Despite all of the changes in the world since I began my career, the Postal Service continues to play an indispensable role in every American community-connecting people to each other, to businesses and their government, one doorstep and mailbox at a time.

I firmly believe that our future is filled with opportunity, not just through the prism of winning customers and growing our business, but also from the perspective of enhancing our brand and the value we provide to the American public. We can reinvigorate the way we serve our customers and the public by constantly looking forward as an organization, anticipating the changing needs of our customers, and adapting as quickly as we can to a competitive and evolving marketplace.

As the world’s greatest delivery organization, we are well-positioned to do so. The pace of change in the delivery business will accelerate in the coming years, and our long-term success depends on strategies that continually strengthen our core offerings. As we move forward, we will do the following :

  • We will invest in the future of the Postal Service. Investing in our future means creating the best opportunities for long-term growth and profitability. It means investing in your training and development; in product and service innovations; in our systems and processes; and improving our use of data and technology. It also means making long overdue improvements to our infrastructure, including upgrading our vehicle fleet and deploying advanced package sortation equipment.
  • We will speed the pace of innovation. The coming years will see greater focus on innovation, with pilot projects designed to test new delivery offerings, new tools to better meet the digital and mobile expectations of our customers, and new offerings designed for America’s small businesses. Our commitment to strategic product and service innovation will help drive our growth and the growth for the industries and businesses we serve.
  • We will develop strategies to better engage and empower employees. As we fully leverage the potential of technology, we want to give you more flexibility and problemsolving tools to deliver greater value for our customers. To best compete for customers, we will need to become more entrepreneurial at every level of the organization.
  • We will also build the most efficient and productive network to support our growth products. We have made tremendous progress streamlining our operational footprint in recent years-allowing us to keep our products and services affordable.

We have a lot of momentum as an organization today-despite our financial challenges. We continue to take prudent steps to bring our costs and revenues into better alignment. However, the way we are structured today and the way we serve the public today will not be adequate to
fully meet the demands of tomorrow’s marketplace. To be successful in the future, we will continually reorient our business strategies to better connect with our customers and redefine the ways we serve the American public.

As we collectively shape a brighter future for the organization, I am always mindful that the Postal Service is not merely defined by what it does, but rather by the many people who have dedicated their careers to serving the American public. Your commitment to our public service mission and to delivering for our customers defines who we are as an organization and is the bedrock of all of our successes.

Thank you for keeping your eyes focused on the future and for serving the public so well. I look forward to working with you.
Sincerely,

Megan J. Brennan

  • Bob Sacamano

    That fat troll was a letter carrier for all of 10 months. Whew ! What a warrior!

  • Comedy show

    It looks god on her 991. They window trained a postmasters wife at my office. She was a clerk but thru nepotism was being appointed as a supervisor over window services. She never worked one day on the window, just needed window experience on her 991.

  • Robert

    Of course nothing about getting the mail to carriers at a normal time, so they can get back to working normal hours. It seems like an eternity ago that we worked 7 to 3:30. All from the constant closing of processing plants has been the main reason, which makes it seems that it is only going to get worse.

  • Postmaster Pig

    She literally looks like a pig.

  • Zeus

    Wow!looks like Megan got a makeover and actually smiled for the picture.Don’t expect her do anything different from her mentor,Mr.Downahole and don’t expect serious negotiations with the APWU as they begin later this month.

  • Look alikes

    Seriously I’m not trying to be rude. Put her picture in this article next to Donahoe and they look like brother and sister. Try it .

  • dcr

    If I am not mistaken, her speech is very similar to the speech Donahoe’s gave when he took over? I am sure there will just be more of the same with this woman. With 82 plants closing and the right wing now controlling the house and senate. I suspect she will be offering an early-out by March. As a result of the closings, there will be15,000 displaced workers and they will need to be put somewhere. It makes no sense to get rid of 15,000 junior people / PSEs and leave thousands of the most senior people. That kind of defeats the purpose of having a lower pay work force.
    I could have retired 6 months ago and I am not leaving until they offer me at least $15,000. Meg, It has been over 2 1/2 years since the last early-out. It’s time to flush the toilet again and let us go with some cash in hand.

  • BigBob

    Makes sense – the people who get ahead in the PO have a relative in high places.

  • John Q

    She left out the part about implanting a GPS device in Letter Carriers

  • BigBob

    Happens ALL the time.
    Had a carrier who had an uncle who was a PM. Got a transfer to our office, was a ‘carrier’ for about a week, got made 204b, and 6 months later the boy wonder is a supervisor in a better office.
    All it takes is a phone call to the right person.

  • Reality Bites

    Then you can expect to be staying many more years, if you haven’t noticed,they have been offering VER’s with no incentives since the last one to a few targeted managers and Postmasters,which means they aren’t serious about getting the retirement eligables out,and don’t expect Brennan to offer any.

  • FOSTER

    Anyone has got to be better than that Donohoe. She has some decent credentials and has come from the craft. I hope she begins treating employees like human beings.

  • Louis Stoole

    I’d still brown bag it.

  • Zjane

    Seriously, how could you write such a comment. What kind of a person are you??